Spill-A-Thon

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Sorry for the delay, time has gotten away from me lately. So you get a combo post. First I see this (4/3/13):

Image links to Treehugger article

“Despite spilling tens, if not hundreds of thousands of gallons of oil and chemicals into an Arkansas neighborhood, thanks to a loophole in a law from 1980, ExxonMobil will not be paying into a federal oil spill cleanup fund because the oil they spilled is not the right type of oil. It is a twisted example of the legal technicalities and lax regulations that all too often favor oil companies, but a coalition of environmental groups are working to close the loophole. According to Congress and the IRS, diluted bitumen or dilbit, which is the type of oil that has spilled in Arkansas, is not classified as oil and companies shipping it are not required to pay an 8-cents-per-barrel excise tax into the federal Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund, as companies shipping conventional oil do. According to the oil industry, tar sands oil is oil when the oil industry needs oil spill cleanup funds, but it isn’t oil when it comes to paying for that cleanup fund. The industry also opposes changes to how tar sands oil pipelines are regulated. So again, they consider tar sands oil just like conventional oil when it comes to their pipelines, but not when it comes to cleaning the spills those pipelines create.

So while the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund will be tapped to clean up spills of tar sands oil, like the Arkansas spill, because of this loophole, ExxonMobil and other oil companies dealing in tar sands dilbit are not helping replenish these funds.

If the oil industry wants to pipe these dangerous tar sands oils over our water sheds and aquifers, putting our drinking supply and neighborhoods at risk, they should not only be required to pay into the cleanup fund, they should be paying far more than the 8 cents per barrel they pay for conventional oil since these tar sands oils are not just worse for the environment, but potentially pose a greater risk of spills and are even harder to clean up.”

Then, not to be outdone (4/5/13)

Image links to Treehugger article

But hey! On the bright side Exxon is cleaning up their mess!

But now I see this (4/5/13):

Image links to Treehugger article

“Company workers wearing logoed shirts roam throughout the town. Local police guard the entrance to the neighborhood where the spill happened. On Starlite Road, where oil flowed down the street last week, workers vacuum up oil in yards and steam-wash pavement. The oil company has also taken over wildlife rescue from a local organization; independent rescuers report that they are being forced to leave private property by ExxonMobil enforcers. (Casualties so far include oil-covered ducks, snakes, and nutria.) Reporters who accompanied Arkansas Attorney General Dustin McDaniel on a tour of the spill on Wednesday were asked to leave by Exxon representatives. Even the state Department of Environmental Quality refers reporters to the Exxon downstream media line for information. Lisa Song at Inside Climate News was one of those journalists threatened with arrest after she went to the command center for the cleanup operation in an attempt to reach an Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Transportation official for an interview. Elsewhere, “an activist indy news team” duo called JNL, has been using Ustream and Twitter to report from Mayflower and interview local residents. Yesterday, they were detained by police and forced to leave private property where they were reporting from, despite having permission to be there.” Follow the link for videos.

So if one follows the mind set of the Zeitgeist movies (and I’m pretty sure I am right now since I watched Addendum yesterday) This was all on purpose. What better way to keep resources limited than by making them less viable? People not feeling well? That’s just a bonus! Think of the money they’ll have to spend to combat the symptoms they’ve just acquired.  Then they can continue to charge what they have been if not raise the prices. Keeping themselves nice and cozy.

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About D.Dinius

I am big on education, animals, and nature. So following that sentence I think it's important to be smart and animals and nature bring clarity and a calmness to things. I am new to actually paying attention and having opinions. This has been building well for about the last year. :)

4 responses »

  1. I commented on this post under the post called Oh Dear. Sorry for the mix up. I did want to say that I love your thoughts at the end about how much more money this will make for others in the form of medical problems because you know this will be bad for years to come. I would never be able to move back to my home if I lived there, yet how in the hell would you sell your house in such a contaminated place. I feel just awful for all those people stuck in that situation.

    • Thank you! I too have a feeling that the people there will be S.O.L. I have a feeling they will do as little as possible. It’s astounding that it took so long to get people there to do anything about it in the first place. You just know they were thinking that people were getting a little too “green” for their tastes and since they know they have to keep up appearances they make it look like a terrible accident. And you’re right. The effects of this will last for years. It’s crazy they found more profit in wasting all that oil than in actually keeping it and using it. 😦 The world is a stage. Razzle dazzle ’em.

    • Yeah, Right! I think I got more riled up by the comments then the catastrophic mess of the oil. And now they are saying it’s made a bigger mess then they imagined. Well of course it has and how in the hell did anyone think it would just be a simple clean up and good to go. I pray that that town can sue the shit out of the pipeline and move out to somewhere far from the mess. All those poor ducks, it just makes me ill thinking about the true depths of contamination that will come about.

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